Charlotte Smarty Pants

Charlotte Smarty Pants – Daily Scoop for Savvy Charlotte Moms

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February 14, 2018

From the Smarty Health Corner and CEENTA: When your child hurts your face

CEENTA Protect Your Face

By our Smarty friends at Charlotte Eye Ear Nose & Throat Associates, P.A.

It seems like just yesterday your baby was a tiny newborn, wrapped in blankets and sleeping the day away. Now little Timmy has grown up just enough to start exploring the world around him, but he’s still not too big to hold. But as adorable as he is, and as much as he loves his mommy and daddy, those exploring hands of his may accidentally injure you. Let’s talk about what to watch out for and what to do if your little one does hurt some part of your face.

Before we start, we both know that your child isn’t intentionally trying to hurt you. Babies and toddlers are impulsive, aren’t completely aware of their bodies, don’t always have complete control of their bodies, and don’t understand the consequences of their actions. So remember: what’s painful to you might just be playful curiosity to them. Read More →

February 6, 2018

Celebrate African American History Month at the Library

CML-AAHistoryMonth

By our Smarty friends at the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library

Charlotte Mecklenburg Library invites you to celebrate African American History Month with FREE programs, including living history events, a local author visit, film screenings and fun and educational activities for children and teens. We’ve also compiled some great reads and resources you can use to continue learning, exploring and having conversations about the moments and people that have shaped our collective past, and provide historical context for the current issues and movements within our community.

What to do

Do you know the Quilt Code? Visit West Boulevard February 21 to learn about quilt patterns believed to have been used as a communication device of the Underground Railroad, and color the patterns that tell the story.

Find out how African American soldiers entered into the armed forces, how they lived, what conditions they faced and how their role was vital in both wars with Maurice Johnson, active member of the Civil War reenactment 102nd U.S. Colored Troops at several library locations throughout February.

Learn about the history of West Charlotte High School and its experience of segregation, integration and re-segregation with local historian and author of Color and Character: West Charlotte High and the American Struggle over Educational Equality, Dr. Pamela Grundy, Wednesday, February 21 at University City Regional Library. Read More →

February 4, 2018

Understanding Learning Differences: Community Workshops and Professional Training from The Rankin Institute | The Fletcher School

By our Smarty friends at The Fletcher School

Since 1982, The Fletcher School (K-12) has been a leader in serving children with Specific Learning Disabilities (SLDs) and ADHD. Through their outreach arm, The Rankin Institute, they educate and empower community members like you by providing the resources and knowledge you need to best serve children with learning differences — be it in school or at home. Fletcher Feb 2018.2

This spring, The Rankin Institute is offering several workshops and trainings to educate teachers, parents, and professionals on the various types of SLDs and techniques to help children with learning differences reach their full potential. Explore their programs below!

Upcoming Community Workshops:

“MY CHILD HAS WHAT?” WORKSHOP SERIES
This series provides information and strategies on specific disorders and diagnoses such as attention deficits, reading and math disorders, auditory processing deficits, anxiety, and related medications. Workshops are taught by professionals in the field related to the topic.

Lost and Found Department: Memory Disorder
Tuesday, March 13, 7:00pm – 8:30pm ($10)
This presentation will focus on the process of memory and strategies and interventions to help children with memory disorders. Presenter: Stephen Strzelecki, Psy.D. of Clinical and Neuropsychological Services. Both parents and professionals are invited to participate. Register. Read More →

January 25, 2018

From the Smarty Health Corner and CEENTA: Talk about glaucoma today

By our Smarty friends at Charlotte Eye Ear Nose & Throat Associates, P.A.

Your parents go to the doctor to ask about any aches and pains or notable changes in their health, but do they ask about conditions with no signs? Many conditions, from strokes to glaucoma, don’t have symptoms, but it’s just as important to talk to your parents about symptomless conditions as those with obvious signs. CEENTA Glaucoma

Luckily, January is Glaucoma Awareness Month, so let’s discuss talking to your parents about this disease.

Glaucoma is an optic nerve disease often called the “silent thief of sight” because there usually aren’t symptoms until the disease has progressed. The optic nerve is made up of many nerve fibers inside the eye, and transmits images you see from the eye to the brain. Glaucoma damages those fibers, which can cause blind spots and vision loss if left untreated. It is often, but not always, caused by a buildup of pressure in the eye when fluid cannot drain properly, but the exact cause is not known and can have multiple factors. Read More →

January 17, 2018

2018 Interior Design Trends

By Smarty guest blogger Brooke Cole

Hi Charlotte Smarties! It is such a pleasure to be here on the blog with you today sharing the interior design trends that I see emerging this year. Whether preparing for a renovation or coming up with a creative way to update your home, I am sure you will find some inspiration here.

White cabinetry is waning

While an all white kitchen can be a tried and true classic, in 2018 you will see a movement away from all white kitchens and white cabinetry in general. Instead you will see cabinetry painted in an array of colors from soft blues, greens and even blush tones. Black and grey cabinetry mixed with gold hardware is a look also on the rise. Stained wood cabinetry is also coming back in style in lighter more natural finishes such as cerused oak. All of these cabinetry applications are being used as an interesting change to a white sterile look.

Design by Traci Zeller Interiors (www.tracizeller.com)

Design by Traci Zeller Interiors | Photo by Brooke Cole

Design by Lisa Mende Designs (www.lisamende.com) | Photo by Kelli Boyd Photography

Design by Lisa Mende Designs | Photo by Kelli Boyd Photography

Bringing Outdoor Elements Inside

I think everyone loves a beautiful and inviting outdoor living space and the industry has seen an uptick in consumer outdoor furnishing purchases in the last few years. But in 2018, I see a trend towards using more outdoor elements inside in several different iterations. First up is outdoor fabrics, which have come a long way in design, texture and feel. The stain impermeability and clean-ability are hard to beat, which make these workhorse fabrics, an indoor must have. Outdoor materials such as wicker, woven, teak and metals-which are all durable and cleanable- will be integrated more into interior furnishing elements. Florals and garden motifs are also heavily trending in the world of fabrics and wallpapers. Read More →

January 12, 2018

From Girls on the Run Charlotte: Five Ways to Teach Kids to Value Improvement Over Winning

By Allison Riley, PhD, Girls on the Run International

One of my two-year-old daughter’s favorite activities is playing with blocks. She enjoys exploring their shape and texture as well as sorting them by color and size. Her ultimate fun is tower building. Since her ability to stack began to bud, she’s spent countless hours stacking and stacking, working her hardest to build an even taller tower. As she stacks blocks on top of one another, I can see the range of emotions crossing her face and, when each tower ultimately comes crashing down, these feelings, particularly frustration, are often magnified. Spring 2018 Program Registration Dates

As I sit on the floor alongside my daughter and observe her structural pursuits, I recognize her effort and remind her of her personal improvement. “You could stack 5 blocks last week and now you can stack 10 blocks. Wow!” Each time her tower falls I encourage her to keep trying and, occasionally, I show her different ways to stack the blocks.

What I am attempting to do, even at this young age, is to create a mastery motivational climate. Perhaps you haven’t heard this specific term before, but the underlying concept is likely a familiar one. In a mastery climate, the emphasis is placed on personal improvement and effort, and mistakes are seen as learning opportunities.

A performance climate, the opposite of a mastery climate, focuses on competition and favorable comparison to others. In the example above, I would instead make the tallest tower I could and define success for my daughter by comparing the height of her tower to the height of mine. Instead of focusing on her growing skill, I would turn tower-building into a lopsided competition. Hopefully we can agree that this approach would not be effective (or pleasant) with my toddler. Why, then, is it so common in youth sports?

As a parent, caretaker or coach, here’s what you can do to create a mastery climate for the kids in your life:

1. Reflect on your own experience in sport and physical activity as a kid.
Gaining an awareness of how your own experiences might influence the environment you’re creating for your kids is a critical first step. After you reflect on your experience and the feelings that those experiences evoked, commit to doing things differently if needed. Just because you were constantly compared to others doesn’t mean it has to be that way for your kids.

2. Recognize effort and personal improvement. In many youth physical activity contexts, only the best athletes are praised and encouraged (performance climate). If we want all kids to have a good experience with physical activity, this is not the most effective approach. When you talk to your kid after a game, instead of asking if they won or who scored the most goals, ask them how they think they improved and if they tried their best.

3. Provide opportunities to practice skills. In a mastery climate, the focus is on learning, so it’s important that kids have a chance to practice their newly developed skills. As a parent, you can help your kids grow by taking some time to work individually with them outside of the practice or game setting. Read More →

January 9, 2018

From the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library: Fill up your new device for FREE at the Library

CSP Image - Fill up your new device

Did you receive a new device this holiday season? You’ve probably been busy adding apps and e-books and music to it from the moment you unboxed it. Well we’ve got great news for you! Charlotte Mecklenburg Library offers many resources to fill up your new device – for free!

If you have a Charlotte Mecklenburg Library card or ONE Access account, you have access to all of this and more!

E-books and e-audiobooks

OverDrive has an extensive collection of e-books, e-audiobooks and read-alongs, with kid- and teen-friendly content in special reading rooms. You can check out up to 10 items per month with a 21-day loan period, and can download titles to your computer, tablet (including Kindle!) or mobile device. Or you can read or listen to them online. New users should check out OverDrive’s new Libby app, but the classic OverDrive app is also available. OverDrive also powers NC Kids Digital Library, which offers e-books, e-audiobooks, streaming videos and read-alongs specifically designed for youth in pre-K through fourth grade. Read More →

January 7, 2018

ADHD, Mindfulness, and More: 7 Winter Workshops on Learning Differences and the Skills to Help You Best Serve Your Child

By our Smarty friends at The Fletcher School

Since 1982, The Fletcher School (K-12) has been a leader in serving children with Specific Learning Disabilities (SLD) and ADHD. Through their outreach arm, The Rankin Institute, they educate and empower community members like you by providing the resources and knowledge you need to best serve children with learning differences — be it in school or at home. IMG_9954

This winter, The Rankin Institute is offering several workshops and trainings to educate teachers, parents, and professionals on the various types of SLDs and techniques to help children with learning differences reach their full potential. Explore their programs and join the community of dedicated parents and professionals striving to best serve and support those who learn differently!

Upcoming Rankin Institute Workshops:

“MY CHILD HAS WHAT?” WORKSHOP SERIES

This series provides information and strategies on specific disorders and diagnoses such as attention deficits, reading and math disorders, auditory processing deficits, anxiety, and related medications. Workshops are taught by professionals in the field related to the topic.

Gimme Just a Little More Time: Auditory Processing Disorder
Tuesday, January 9, 7:00pm – 9:00pm ($10)

This workshop will examine the impact of auditory processing disorders and offer strategies for
improving performance. Presenter: Barrie Morganstein, Ph.D. of Southeast Psychological Services. Both parents and professionals are invited to participate. Register. Read More →

December 21, 2017

From the Smarty Health Corner and CEENTA: Good deals for your dollars

By our Smarty friends at Charlotte Eye Ear Nose & Throat Associates, P.A.

While you’re in the whirlwind of the holiday season, it’s easy to forget some of the more mundane parts of life, like your healthcare benefits. But if your benefits include a flexible spending account, you’ll want to use that money before the end of the year. Fortunately, CEENTA has several great ways to spend your FSA dollars.Woman buying glasses

New glasses: You’re going to see your friends and family a lot more this holiday season, so why not see them clearly? You can come to any of CEENTA’s optical locations and get 25 percent off a new set of prescription glasses. Also, if you want to make sure your prescription is up to date, be sure to request an appointment with one of our eye doctors first.

New hearing aids: From carolers to conversations with family, there’s a lot to hear during the holidays. You may also have older relatives who are starting to lose their hearing. Since hearing is tied to both mental and emotional health, our physicians and audiologists will work together to address your hearing concerns and fit you with hearing aids that best suit your needs. Once your tests are complete, you can purchase hearing aids for 10 percent off at any of our offices that offer audiology services. Read More →

December 20, 2017

From Pediatric Hair Solutions: Top 5 Tips to Avoid Head Lice this Winter

By Smarty Guest Blogger, Sheila Fassler, RN, founder and owner of Pediatric Hair Solutions

As winter approaches, so does the potential for head lice. Lice is common in the colder months as kids spend time in closer quarters, families gather for the holidays, and hats and scarves are worn and shared. Portrait mother and daughter outdoors in winter

Don’t worry, you don’t have to quarantine your child until spring to avoid getting head lice. Follow these helpful tips to prevent the pesky parasite from finding their way to your child’s head this winter.

1. Avoid Head to Head Contact (including snuggling and selfies!)

No matter the season, direct head-to-head contact is the primary reason that head lice spreads from one person to another. Teach your children to avoid close hugs, snuggles and selfies whenever possible.

2. Don’t Share Hats, Jackets or Scarves

While it is less common for lice to spread through clothing, your child should not share hats or any winter clothing that comes in contact with hair.

3. Avoid ‘Community Piles’

If your child wears a winter jacket or hat to school, tell them it’s best to keep it zipped up in their backpack. If the weather warms up by the time recess rolls around, tell your child to avoid tossing their jacket or hat in a community pile on the recess field. Little Girl Whispers A Secret to Her Baby Brother Wearing Winter Coats and Hats Sitting Outdoors at the Park.

4. Keep Hair in Buns or Braids

If you have a daughter, it’s a good idea to keep her hair in a tight bun or braid. Loose hair is much more likely to come in contact with hair from another child or adult with an active case of head lice.

5. Use Prevention Spray

Lice have an acute sense of smell. They do not like the scent of mint, rosemary or tea tree oil. It’s best to use a scented prevention product, like Pediatric Hair Solutions Mint Prevention Spray, before your child goes to school, a playdate or a sleepover.

It’s always a good idea to check your children frequently for head lice. I recommend moms designate one day a week, like Sunday nights after bath time, to do head checks. Treating head lice in its early stages keeps it from spreading to other family members and can be easier to treat.

About the Author:

Sheila Fassler, RN, worked as an Intensive Care Unit nurse and a volunteer school nurse at her children’s elementary school. She founded and owns Pediatric Hair Solutions, the only licensed health care practice dedicated to the professional treatment of head lice, located in South Charlotte, Lake Norman and 6 other locations in the Carolinas. Sheila attended Akron University College of Nursing. After marrying her husband, the two moved to the Carolinas to start a family. The couple’s two children both attend the University of South Carolina.


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